Etymology & Historical Origin of the Baby Name Desiree

The English get the name Desiree from the French Désirée derived from the Late Latin “desideratum” meaning ‘desired, wished’. The male form is Désiré which was the name of a 6th-century French saint who helped to popularize the name in medieval France. As a courtier at the court of king Chlothar I, King of the Franks, St. Désiré was effective in combating heresy and simony thanks to his peacemaking skills. He was eventually made bishop of Bourgues and apparently performed miracles. His feast day is May 8th. However, what popularized this name among English speakers was a 1954 film called “Désirée” starring Marlon Brando and Jean Simmons. The film was based on the 1952 bestselling biographical novel of the same name which fictionalizes the story of Désirée Clary who was engaged to Napoleon Bonaparte before Joséphine. After Napoleon broke off their engagement, Désirée would later become Queen consort of Sweden and Norway when she married Charles XIV John of Sweden. Desiree as a female name among English speakers has enjoyed modest success.

All About the Baby Name – Desiree

Personality

OF THE GIRL NAME DESIREE

The number 11 is a Master Number, and embodies heightened traits of the Two. This personality is on a life journey to find spiritual truth. They are extremely idealistic and intuitive. Elevens have a rare and exceptional spiritual energy that brings a sense of obligation to illuminate the world around them. It's a very powerful responsibility, but these people have far more potential than they know. It's important that they surrender to higher ideals. They have the capacity to see the bigger picture, and they possess the skills to inspire others spiritually. Elevens have strong diplomatic skills and can become great peacemakers. Master numbers can be both a blessing and a curse, as they walk the fine line between greatness and the potential for self-destruction.

Popularity

OF THE GIRL NAME DESIREE

The name Desiree made her first appearance on the American female naming charts in 1954 – the same year the film mentioned above was released. The name instantly jumped over 650 positions up the charts the following year. This demonstrated a remarkable triumph for a once obscure name. The name slowly grew in popularity in the ensuing years. Desiree achieved a spot on the Top 100 list in only one year (1983). The height of Desiree’s popularity was during the 1980s and 90s, but since we’ve entered the 21st century, American parents appear to be tiring of this French beauty. Desiree has a sophisticated French flair and is a name to consider for Francophile parents out there (Camille, Celeste, Chloe, Claire, Giselle, Jacqueline, Josephine are more of our French favorites). Desiree is indeed a “desirable” name and I “wish” it was mine!

Quick Facts

ON DESIREE

GENDER:

Girl

ORIGIN:

English

NUMBER OF SYLLABLES:

3

RANKING POPULARITY:

629

PRONUNCIATION:

DEZ-er-ay

SIMPLE MEANING:

Desired, wished

Characteristics

OF DESIREE

Inspirational

Highly Intuitive

Spiritual Teacher

Extremely Bright

Uplifting

Truth-seeker

Cultural References to the Baby Name – Desiree

Literary Characters

OF THE BABY NAME DESIREE

Popular Songs

ON DESIREE

Desiree
a song by The Left Banke

Famous People

NAMED DESIREE

Désirée Clary (Swedish royalty)
Desireé Bassett (rock guitarist)

Children of Famous People

NAMED DESIREE

We cannot find any children of famous people with the first name Desiree

Historic Figures

WITH THE NAME DESIREE

Lucille Ball is arguably the finest comedienne of modern time. Born in Jamestown, New York on August 6, 1911, into a family that traced their American origins back to colonial days, Lucille Ball died on April 26, 1989, at age 78. Though she had a moderately successful career in modeling, on Broadway, in movies and radio, it is for her signature role as Lucy Ricardo on the groundbreaking 1950s television sitcom series, I Love Lucy, that she will be forever and most lovingly remembered. She and her husband, Cuban bandleader and singer, Desi Arnaz, revolutionized early television and changed the making of television series, with their camera innovations and insistence on filming from California rather than New York, thereby filming before a live studio audience. It was also felt quite strongly at the time that audiences would never accept the red headed, fair Lucille Ball with an ethnic husband – a misconception that was immediately proven wrong. They reigned supreme for years, and after their divorce, Lucille went on to star in various other comic series on her own, as well as being the operational head of Desilu Productions, eventually buying out Desi Arnaz altogether. Lucille and Desi had two children and divorced in 1960. She was married to her second husband, Gary Morton, from 1961 until her death. The recipient of countless honorariums and awards, she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously by President George H. W. Bush in 1989. Doubtless, though, the finest award, we are sure she would agree, is the continuing echo of pealing laughter that still greets her image every day around the world, in non-stop syndication.

Lucille Ball is arguably the finest comedienne of modern time. Born in Jamestown, New York on August 6, 1911, into a family that traced their American origins back to colonial days, Lucille Ball died on April 26, 1989, at age 78. Though she had a moderately successful career in modeling, on Broadway, in movies and radio, it is for her signature role as Lucy Ricardo on the groundbreaking 1950s television sitcom series, I Love Lucy, that she will be forever and most lovingly remembered. She and her husband, Cuban bandleader and singer, Desi Arnaz, revolutionized early television and changed the making of television series, with their camera innovations and insistence on filming from California rather than New York, thereby filming before a live studio audience. It was also felt quite strongly at the time that audiences would never accept the red headed, fair Lucille Ball with an ethnic husband – a misconception that was immediately proven wrong. They reigned supreme for years, and after their divorce, Lucille went on to star in various other comic series on her own, as well as being the operational head of Desilu Productions, eventually buying out Desi Arnaz altogether. Lucille and Desi had two children and divorced in 1960. She was married to her second husband, Gary Morton, from 1961 until her death. The recipient of countless honorariums and awards, she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously by President George H. W. Bush in 1989. Doubtless, though, the finest award, we are sure she would agree, is the continuing echo of pealing laughter that still greets her image every day around the world, in non-stop syndication.

Lucille Ball is arguably the finest comedienne of modern time. Born in Jamestown, New York on August 6, 1911, into a family that traced their American origins back to colonial days, Lucille Ball died on April 26, 1989, at age 78. Though she had a moderately successful career in modeling, on Broadway, in movies and radio, it is for her signature role as Lucy Ricardo on the groundbreaking 1950s television sitcom series, I Love Lucy, that she will be forever and most lovingly remembered. She and her husband, Cuban bandleader and singer, Desi Arnaz, revolutionized early television and changed the making of television series, with their camera innovations and insistence on filming from California rather than New York, thereby filming before a live studio audience. It was also felt quite strongly at the time that audiences would never accept the red headed, fair Lucille Ball with an ethnic husband – a misconception that was immediately proven wrong. They reigned supreme for years, and after their divorce, Lucille went on to star in various other comic series on her own, as well as being the operational head of Desilu Productions, eventually buying out Desi Arnaz altogether. Lucille and Desi had two children and divorced in 1960. She was married to her second husband, Gary Morton, from 1961 until her death. The recipient of countless honorariums and awards, she was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously by President George H. W. Bush in 1989. Doubtless, though, the finest award, we are sure she would agree, is the continuing echo of pealing laughter that still greets her image every day around the world, in non-stop syndication.