Etymology & Historical Origin of the Baby Name Frida

Frida and Frieda are German names; the Scandinavian form is Fríða. They are all derived from the Germanic element “frid” meaning “peace”. In fact, the modern word “peace” replaced the Olde English “frið” which was also associated with the word “happiness” (as in peace of mind). Some people mistakenly believe that the Old Norse Fríða means “beautiful, beloved” but they are confusing her with Freyja (a different name altogether). In Nordic mythology, Freyja was a goddess of love and beauty, and her name actually means “lady”. Frida, however, means “peace”. The name was most famously borne by the celebrated Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954). Incidentally, Frida Kahlo’s father was born in Germany, of German-Jewish descent, and settled in Mexico at the age of 19. This is how the Mexican artist received her Germanic first name. Today the name Frida is especially popular in Norway and Denmark, but it is also used with regularity in Germany and Sweden.

All About the Baby Name – Frida

Personality

OF THE GIRL NAME FRIDA

The number 11 is a Master Number, and embodies heightened traits of the Two. This personality is on a life journey to find spiritual truth. They are extremely idealistic and intuitive. Elevens have a rare and exceptional spiritual energy that brings a sense of obligation to illuminate the world around them. It's a very powerful responsibility, but these people have far more potential than they know. It's important that they surrender to higher ideals. They have the capacity to see the bigger picture, and they possess the skills to inspire others spiritually. Elevens have strong diplomatic skills and can become great peacemakers. Master numbers can be both a blessing and a curse, as they walk the fine line between greatness and the potential for self-destruction.

Popularity

OF THE GIRL NAME FRIDA

The name Frida was only on America’s Top 1000 list for nine years, between 2001 and 2009. Likely the name’s usage was influenced by the popular 2002 film “Frida” starring Salma Hayek as surrealist Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. The name’s best year on the charts was the year following the movie’s release (2003) when she ranked 650 out of 1000 (in other words, Frida never gained any real steam). Today the name no longer exists on America’s Top 1000 list, which means it’s a rare choice by all accounts. As a Germanic name, Frida is strong and no-nonsense, even a bit forceful in sound. Yet the balance of her “peaceful” etymology makes this one a confident choice.

Quick Facts

ON FRIDA

GENDER:

Girl

ORIGIN:

German

NUMBER OF SYLLABLES:

2

RANKING POPULARITY:

N/A

PRONUNCIATION:

FREE-da

SIMPLE MEANING:

Peace

Characteristics

OF FRIDA

Inspirational

Highly Intuitive

Spiritual Teacher

Extremely Bright

Uplifting

Truth-seeker

Cultural References to the Baby Name – Frida

Literary Characters

OF THE BABY NAME FRIDA

We cannot find any significant literary characters by the name of Frida

Popular Songs

ON FRIDA

Frida
is an opera based on the life of Frida Kahlo

Famous People

NAMED FRIDA

Frida Kahlo (Mexican painter)

Children of Famous People

NAMED FRIDA

We cannot find any children of famous people with the first name Frida

Historic Figures

WITH THE NAME FRIDA

Frida Kahlo (de Rivera) was the famous Mexican artist who is known as much for her association with Diego Rivera as for her own paintings, most notably her self-portraits. Born of a German Jewish father and a Mexican mother, Frida was early on moved to study medicine. The victim of a devastating bus accident when she was a teenager, Frida took to painting during her long convalescence. The resulting injuries would plague her all her life, leaving her wounded, in pain and in need of multiple surgeries, all of which conditions seeped into her paintings. Her volatile relationship with Rivera, whom she married, divorced, remarried and lived within an uncomfortable form of “open marriage”, was another overwhelming inspiration for her suffering-infused artwork. She died at the young age of forty-seven, and in spite of some significant recognition of her work during her lifetime, it was not until the 1980’s that she achieved the cult status she enjoys today. Embraced by feminists and art lovers alike, perhaps the best assessment of her legacy was uttered in 1938 by fellow artist Andre Breton, who called her work “a ribbon around a bomb”.