Etymology & Historical Origin of the Baby Name Myles

Myles is a variant spelling of Miles. We know that Miles is of Norman origin, but it can’t be derived from any specific Old French or Germanic word. It could have come from an altered pet form of Michael (meaning “who is like God?” – see Michael). The Latin word “miles” means ‘soldier’ or some such military attribute due to its association with Michael (the soldier angel of God). It could also be connected to the Slavic element “mil” which means ‘grace, favor’ brought to England by way of the Vikings. Lastly, Myles could also be the anglicized form of the Irish name Maolra from the earlier “Moail-Mhuire” meaning ‘devotee of Mary’. Whatever the origin, the name has been in use in England since the 16th century, but in America it is probably mostly associated with the Mayflower passenger Myles Standish and the great jazz musician Miles Davis.

All About the Baby Name – Myles

Personality

OF THE BOY NAME MYLES

The Number 2 personality in numerology is all about cooperation and balance. It's the number of diplomats and mediators. They are not leaders, but strive rather for harmony in partnerships. These are the peacemakers. Equality and fairness are important in their dealings, and they are willing to share power and responsibility to achieve a harmonious outcome. This personality is calm and patient, waiting for things to evolve instead of pushing aggressively for an outcome. They are good-natured and easy-going, and care deeply on an emotional and spiritual plane. Twos appreciate beauty and nature and are intent on making the world a better place.

Popularity

OF THE BOY NAME MYLES

The name Miles has enjoyed more success in America than the spelling variant Myles. Nonetheless, Myles has held its own on the U.S. naming charts for well over 100 years. Myles had pretty low usage rates until the mid-1970s when it began to take off up the charts with a little more intensity. The name saw its biggest jumps on the charts in the 1980s. Today, Myles is a medium favorite. It’s bestowed upon roughly 1,500 baby boys each year (by comparison, the #1 favorite is given to about 20,000 baby boys a year). Whether you spell it Myles or Miles, the name is one cool-cat, no denying that. Jazzy, lively, interesting. We expect this one to keep ‘soldiering’ on.

Quick Facts

ON MYLES

GENDER:

Boy

ORIGIN:

English

NUMBER OF SYLLABLES:

1

RANKING POPULARITY:

224

PRONUNCIATION:

MYLEZ

SIMPLE MEANING:

Soldier

Characteristics

OF MYLES

Cooperative

Considerate

Compassionate

Nurturing

Sensitive

Patient

Loving

Kind

Gracious

Balanced

Cultural References to the Baby Name – Myles

Literary Characters

OF THE BABY NAME MYLES

Myles Crawford is a character in James Joyce’s 1922 novel, Ulysses. He is the editor of the “Freeman’s Journal”, and truth be told, he is not all that likeable a character. He appears in the “Aeolus” section of the novel, being the counterpart to Homer’s depiction of the god of winds. As Aeolus first confers gifts upon Ulysses, so does Myles upon Bloom, and as Aeolus later retrieves these gifts, so, too, does Myles. Myles, we must admit, is not all that sympathetic a character, being an arrogant, boozy, chauvinistic, crude, backward-looking, tyrannical boss – but – and it’s a big, redeeming but – the name sounds great – doesn’t it!?

The Courtship of Myles Standish is a narrative poem written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in 1858. The poem is set in the early days of Plymouth Colony settled by pilgrims fresh off the Mayflower ship, and during a time of Native-American unrest (1621). It is the story of a love-triangle between Myles Standish, Priscilla Mullins, and John Alden, and is said to be true and passed to Longfellow (an Alden descendent) through oral tradition. Captain Myles Standish is the middle-aged, brave, swaggering military hero if a bit rough around the edges, and who just lost his wife and seeks to marry Pricilla. John Alden is Standish’s young and handsome roommate whom he asks to deliver his (Myles’) marriage proposal to the beautiful Pricilla on his behalf (fearing he lacks the right way with words). John Alden goes to Pricilla to deliver the proposal but is clearly enamored with the young beauty himself; thus, he innocently bumbles the message, clumsily attempts to recover, and muddles that effort until finally Pricilla makes her famous retort: “Prithee, John, why do you not speak for yourself?" In the end, John gets the girl and Myles “standish’s” aside having given his blessing to the young lovers. It’s an optimistic ending; a fresh start for these new settlers in this new land.

Popular Songs

ON MYLES

We cannot find any popular or well-known songs with the name of Myles


Famous People

NAMED MYLES

Myles Goodwyn (musician)
Myles Standish (pilgrim)
Myles Thomas (baseball player)

Children of Famous People

NAMED MYLES

We cannot find any children of famous people with the first name Myles

Historic Figures

WITH THE NAME MYLES

One of the Mayflower passengers, Myles Standish was an English military officer hired by the Pilgrims as a military advisor for the Plymouth Colony. A defining characteristic of Standish's military leadership was his appetite for defensive action which resulted in at least two small scuffles on different groups of Native Americans. During these actions, Standish exhibited considerable courage and skill as a soldier, but also demonstrated a brutality that angered Native Americans and disturbed more moderate members of the Colony. One of the best known depictions of Standish in popular culture was the 1858 book, The Courtship of Myles Standish by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Highly fictionalized, the story presents Standish as a timid romantic. It was extremely popular in the 19th century and played a significant role in cementing the Pilgrim story in American culture.

One of the Mayflower passengers, Miles Standish was an English military officer hired by the Pilgrims as a military advisor for the Plymouth Colony. A defining characteristic of Standish's military leadership was his appetite for defensive action which resulted in at least two small scuffles on different groups of Native Americans. During these actions, Standish exhibited considerable courage and skill as a soldier, but also demonstrated a brutality that angered Native Americans and disturbed more moderate members of the Colony. One of the best known depictions of Standish in popular culture was the 1858 book, The Courtship of Miles Standish by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Highly fictionalized, the story presents Standish as a timid romantic. It was extremely popular in the 19th century and played a significant role in cementing the Pilgrim story in American culture.