Etymology & Historical Origin of the Baby Name Robert

The name Robert comes from the old Germanic name Hrodberht, derived from the near-synonymous elements “hrod” meaning 'fame or glory' and “berht” meaning 'bright, shining'. The French Normans introduced this name to Britain in the 11th century (after the Norman Conquest of England), where it replaced the Olde English cognate Hreodbeorht. Robert has remained a very common English name since the Middle Ages. The name was borne by two early kings of France, two Dukes of Normandy, and three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. Robert has been a perennial favorite among English-speaking nations. Like William, Richard, John, Thomas, Edward, George, Henry and James – Robert is a male name that has been in continual use for centuries. The name has also given birth to several variations and pet forms including Rob, Robbie, Robin, Rupert, Bo, Bert, Bob and Bobby. Robert remains a popular choice throughout the British Isles and Ireland as well as North America. The Spanish form of the name, Roberto, is ranked high in Spain, Mexico and Latin America.

All About the Baby Name – Robert

Personality

OF THE BOY NAME ROBERT

Romance is the hallmark of the Six personality. They exude nurturing, loving, and caring energy. Sixes are in love with the idea of love in its idealized form - and with their magnetic personalities, they easily draw people toward them. Like the number Two personality, they seek balance and harmony in their life and the world at large. They are conscientious and service-oriented, and a champion for the underdog. These personalities naturally attract money and are usually surrounded by lovely material objects - but their human relationships are always primary. They thrive in giving back to others rather than being motivated by their own desires. This is when they achieve great things. Sixes are natural teachers, ministers and counselors.

Popularity

OF THE BOY NAME ROBERT

As mentioned above, Robert has remained an all-time favorite boys name since the Middle Ages. In the United States, specifically, Robert has enjoyed the same perennial success. The name has maintained a top spot of the American charts since the U.S. government began tracking naming trends in 1880. For 110 straight years, Robert was a Top 10 choice for little boys. The height of the name’s popularity was during the late 1920s all through most of the 1930s when it reached the coveted #1 position on the charts. Not many names can claim that victory! It was not until recently (1990) that Robert finally fell off the Top 10 list. Then, in 2009, he fell from the Top 50. Robert has stepped aside in the 21st century to make room for modern naming trends that favor names like Ethan, Noah, Aiden, Connor and Logan. Names like John, Robert, Thomas and Richard are still holding their own on the naming charts, but they have languished a bit in usage. Not to despair. Robert is an age-old name loaded with ancestral importance among English speakers but without the heavy Biblical baggage. Popular since medieval times, Robert still feels completely modern and stylish. It’s a name for the traditional parents of today. If your little boy exhibits traits of ‘shining brightly’ and you think he’s destined for ‘fame’ – then Robert is an excellent choice!

Quick Facts

ON ROBERT

GENDER:

Boy

ORIGIN:

English

NUMBER OF SYLLABLES:

2

RANKING POPULARITY:

62

PRONUNCIATION:

RAH-bərt

SIMPLE MEANING:

Famed, bright, shining, glory

Characteristics

OF ROBERT

Humanitarian

Community-minded

Family-oriented

Loving

Affectionate

Compassionate

Sensitive

Cultural References to the Baby Name – Robert

Literary Characters

OF THE BABY NAME ROBERT

“The Success of Robert Fitzgibbons” is an illustrated book by Eric Blank that inspires and encourages people of all ages to discover and realize their dreams. The central message is that it's never too late to follow your heart. Throughout his early life, Robert excelled in everything he was expected to do -- school, sports and his career. However, he spent his time pleasing others while never taking into account his own happiness. Even success does not bring Robert fulfillment. Through his journey, Robert Fitzgibbons shows that it is never too late to follow his heart and achieve happiness - the ultimate success. "The Success of Robert Fitzgibbons" will stimulate readers to set their dreams in motion. It is an encouraging story that inspires readers to embrace who they are and to take action to follow their dreams. This book is designed for readers 9-12, but a sure-fire hit for the whole family.

Robert Jordan is the main character in Ernest Hemingway’s 1940 novel, For Whom the Bells Toll. The book tells the story of Robert Jordan, an American who hides out in caves during the Spanish Civil War and wages guerrilla war against the fascists. Robert Jordan is a great and admirable character, known, above-all, for his stoicism, grace under pressure, and toughness. He is Hemingway’s creation of the anti-fascist hero. Jordan embodies what's called "the Hemingway Code," the idea that "there probably isn't God or a world after this so you have to establish for yourself a code of behavior so you can be happy with what you left behind." Robert Jordan is manly, honorable and idealistic, even in the face of sure defeat. He's charged with blowing up a bridge. It's a bad order, and he knows it. Yet he carries out his mission, protecting the small band of fighters who've been helping him in the snow-covered mountains. He sacrifices himself, for their cause. In a 2002 public radio interview former presidential hopeful John McCain said, "Robert Jordan was everything I ever wanted to be."

The romantic late-18th century Scottish poet and lyricist Robert Burns took pen to paper in a few notable verses after meeting a young Scottish lass named Lesley Bailly. He was obviously smitten with her, but their acquaintance would be brief. She clearly left his heart a-pounding and inspired some beautiful lyrics. In “O saw ye bonnie Lesley” Burns wrote, in part: “To see her is to love her, / And love but her for ever; / For Nature made her what she is, / And ne'er made sic anither! / Thou art a queen, fair Lesley, / Thy subjects we, before thee: / Thou art divine, fair Lesley, / The hearts o' men adore thee.”

Popular Songs

ON ROBERT

Brian and Robert
a song by Phish

Courage, Robert
a song by Meg & Dia

Doctor Robert
a song by The Beatles

God Bless Robert E. Lee
a song by Johnny Cash

Robert
a song by Dolly Parton

Famous People

NAMED ROBERT

Robert I (King of the Scots)
Robert I (Duke of Normandy)
Robert Burns (poet)
Robert Frost (poet)
Robert Louis Stevenson (novelist)
Robert E Lee (General of the confederate army)
Robert Oppenheimer (nuclear physicist)
Robert F. Kennedy (former U.S. Attorney General)
Robert De Niro (actor)
Robert Redford (actor)
Robert 'Bob' Marley (Reggae musician)
Robert Ludlum (author)
Robert Allen Zimmerman (aka Bob Dylan, musician)
Robert Plant (musician)
Robert Palmer (musician)
Robert Pattinson (actor)
Robert Downey, Jr. (actor)
Robert Duvall (actor)
Robert James Ritchie (aka Kid Rock, musician)
Robert Altman (film director)
Robert Trent Jones (golfer and course designer)
Robert I (King of the Scots)
Robert I (Duke of Normandy)
Robert Burns (poet)
Robert Frost (poet)
Robert Louis Stevenson (novelist)
Robert E Lee (General of the confederate army)
Robert Oppenheimer (nuclear physicist)
Robert F. Kennedy (former U.S. Attorney General)
Robert De Niro (actor)
Robert Redford (actor)
Robert 'Bob' Marley (Reggae musician)
Robert Ludlum (author)
Robert Allen Zimmerman (aka Bob Dylan, musician)
Robert Plant (musician)
Robert Palmer (musician)
Robert Pattinson (actor)
Robert Downey, Jr. (actor)
Robert Duvall (actor)
Robert James Ritchie (aka Kid Rock, musician)
Robert Altman (film director)
Robert Trent Jones (golfer and course designer)
Robert I (King of the Scots)
Robert I (Duke of Normandy)
Robert Burns (poet)
Robert Frost (poet)
Robert Louis Stevenson (novelist)
Robert E Lee (General of the confederate army)
Robert Oppenheimer (nuclear physicist)
Robert F. Kennedy (former U.S. Attorney General)
Robert De Niro (actor)
Robert Redford (actor)
Robert 'Bob' Marley (Reggae musician)
Robert Ludlum (author)
Robert Allen Zimmerman (aka Bob Dylan, musician)
Robert Plant (musician)
Robert Palmer (musician)
Robert Pattinson (actor)
Robert Downey, Jr. (actor)
Robert Duvall (actor)
Robert James Ritchie (aka Kid Rock, musician)
Robert Altman (film director)
Robert Trent Jones (golfer and course designer)

Children of Famous People

NAMED ROBERT

We cannot find any children of famous people with the first name Robert

Historic Figures

WITH THE NAME ROBERT

Leroy “Satchel” Paige was the extraordinary Negro League pitcher and Hall of Famer, who made his Major League debut at the unprecedented age of 42, signing with the Cleveland Indians on his birthday. From humble beginnings in Alabama, Leroy Paige gained his famous nickname as a boy toting travelers’ satchels from the train station. (That nickname was to gain fame again in 1987, when Woody Allen and Mia Farrow named their son Satchel – which he, of course, dropped as soon as he was able.) Leroy acquired his formidable pitching skills while in reform school and never looked back – as he famously said – “something might be gaining on you”. His career began in 1926 and ended in 1968, and took him from the Negro Leagues to the Major Leagues in a whirlwind of teams and travels, both in and out of the United States. No less a star than Joe Di Maggio remarked of him: “He was the best and the fastest pitcher I’ve ever faced.” Always a cool guy, Leroy Satchel Paige left an envious legacy unmatched to this day.

Rob Roy was a famous Scottish folk hero known for stealing from the rich and giving to the poor, acquiring legendary status over the years as his tale was told and re-told. Essentially a cattleman, Rob Roy most likely rustled a good deal of his livestock. This was not looked upon as a necessarily bad thing – even the Black Watch regiment, which was formed specifically to control cattle rustling, looked the other way for enough money. In addition, Rob Roy was a Jacobite, i.e., a supporter of the restoration of the Stuart line to the throne. Other than that, the mythology is pretty much up for grabs, and many have taken the bait. It appears to have been a cattle deal gone bad that started the whole legend business, with Rob Roy resorting to the life of an outlaw after being branded as such by the Duke of Montrose, and having been stripped of his property and his living. Rob Roy took up arms against the duke, and continued to do so for many years, until being caught and imprisoned. Luckily, he was pardoned by George I, and in 1727, allowed to return home, where he lived out his final years in peace. Already the stuff of mythology by the time of his death, Rob Roy’s reputation was enhanced even further by literary works by Sir Walter Scott, Daniel Defoe and William Wordsworth, not to mention Liam Neeson’s heroic portrayal of him in the 1995 movie. And – he has a cocktail named after him – what higher accolade?!

Rob Roy was a famous Scottish folk hero known for stealing from the rich and giving to the poor, acquiring legendary status over the years as his tale was told and re-told. Essentially a cattleman, Rob Roy most likely rustled a good deal of his livestock. This was not looked upon as a necessarily bad thing – even the Black Watch regiment, which was formed specifically to control cattle rustling, looked the other way for enough money. In addition, Rob Roy was a Jacobite, i.e., a supporter of the restoration of the Stuart line to the throne. Other than that, the mythology is pretty much up for grabs, and many have taken the bait. It appears to have been a cattle deal gone bad that started the whole legend business, with Rob Roy resorting to the life of an outlaw after being branded as such by the Duke of Montrose, and having been stripped of his property and his living. Rob Roy took up arms against the duke, and continued to do so for many years, until being caught and imprisoned. Luckily, he was pardoned by George I, and in 1727, allowed to return home, where he lived out his final years in peace. Already the stuff of mythology by the time of his death, Rob Roy’s reputation was enhanced even further by literary works by Sir Walter Scott, Daniel Defoe and William Wordsworth, not to mention Liam Neeson’s heroic portrayal of him in the 1995 movie. And – he has a cocktail named after him – what higher accolade?!